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Dr. Naana Jumah, BASc MD DPhil FRCSC

Joined Health Research Institute

2014

Education

  • BASc, Chemical Engineering, University of Toronto
  • DPhil, Engineering Sciences, University of Oxford (Oxford, UK)
  • MD, Harvard Medical School (Cambridge, MA)
  • Residency, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto
  • Fellowship, Addiction Medicine, University of Toronto

Appointments and Affiliations

Present

  • Obstetrician Gynaecologist, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre
  • Assistant Professor, Northern Ontario School of Medicine (West Campus)
  • Adjunct Professor, University of Toronto

Articles

Publications

Contact

Email: njumah@nosm.ca

Dr. Naana Jumah, BASc MD DPhil FRCSC

Clinician Scientist

Focus on Women’s and Indigenous Women’s Health

Most researchers – and especially clinician researchers – tend to specialize within one specific area of health care. Although Dr. Naana Jumah concentrates on women’s health and Indigenous women’s health in particular, she combines her rich academic background and training in medicine (specifically gynaecology and obstetrics) and engineering, allowing her to investigate a wide variety of health topics.

For one, Dr. Jumah is conducting research into addiction in pregnancy. Through a series of integrated research studies, Dr. Jumah is determining how to organize a model of care that addresses the needs of opiate-dependent pregnant women in Northwestern Ontario. Ultimately, she hopes to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes by developing a comprehensive and integrated care pathway including the development of evidence-based guidelines for opiate dependence treatment in pregnancy and postpartum in rural and remote settings.

Dr. Jumah is also working with First Nations in the area to increase access to care and promote healthier lifestyles. She is part of the team helping Dr. Ingeborg Zehbe and others to improve cervical cancer screening among First Nation women in Northwestern Ontario and reduce the rate of cervical cancer, which is up to 20 times higher than the Canadian average.

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